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Spirit of co-operation is needed for progress

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“If this country or the world is going to get anywhere it will have to be on the spirit of co-operation and not on the old principle of competition, which led to misery, poverty and finally to war,” said Mr. W. a. Burke, Labour candidate for Burnley, to local members of the Co-operative Party, on Monday.

Mr. Burke who was speaking on the cost of living, said that so far as raw materials were concerned they were outside the control of the Government to a large extent, but Mr. Atlee had gone to America to see President Truman and had said that something would have to be done about raw material scarcities and high prices, not by competing with each other, but by co-operation. Committees had been set up to see how best these raw materials could be allocated to all the world.

In every other country in the world the cost of living had risen higher than it was here, with the exception of Norway, Sweden and Denmark, which had a Labour Government until last October.

NO COAL DURING THE HOLIDAYS

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Because coal is not allocated to coal merchants during colliery holidays, state the Burnley Coal Traders Society, customers will have to wait an extra fortnight – round about the holiday period, in addition to the normal interval between deliveries.

During the 26 weeks (May to October) the maximum amount a consumer can obtain is 20cwt, and as merchants have to stack 2cwt, to meet winter needs.

The approximate delivery during the summer six months period will be 18cwt.

MORE SCARLET FEVER

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Births registered in Bristol last week numbered 186 rate per 1,000 23.93.

Total deaths 89, rate per 1,000 11.45.

Infectious disease cases notified; diphtheria, three; scarlet fever, 203; pulmonary tuberculosis 11; non-pulmonary tuberculosis, one.

BOBBY LOCKE “TIED IT UP” WITH LAST ROUND OF 66

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Open Champion Bobby Locke achieved the seemingly impossible at Wentworth, Surrey, yesterday, when, with a glorious final round of 66, he won a dramatic tussle for the £350 first prize in the 90-holes Dunlop 2000 Guineas Tournament with an aggregate of 353.

Charlie Ward had a final 69 for 355, and Max Faulkner, last year’s winner, also came up with a 69 to take third place at 356.

Just as praiseworthy was John Panton’s performance. The Scottish champion came along with a tremendous last round of 67 to take fifth place.

Rarely has there been a greater finish nor a finer last round. The thousands of spectators who watched the play on the “tight” 6,701 yards West Course in perfect weather were provided with a succession of thrills which reached a climax when Locke required a par 5 at the 490-yeard 18th to beat Ward.

COLLIER KILLED BY ROOF FALL

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A Dover collier, Alfred Woodland, aged 56m of 44, Alfred Road, was killed by a fall of roof early on Thursday morning, at Betteshanger Colliery, where he was working at the coalface.

In accordance with the normal practice, the early morning shift ceased work.

The date of the inquest as not yet been fixed.

MUNICIPAL TRADING AN “ENCROACHMENT”

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Grocers’ Protest to M.P.s

 

Derby Grocers’ Association has protested to local M.P.s against the “grossly unfair and unwanted clause” in the Local Government Bill relating to municipal trading, it was stated in the Association’s annual report which was adopted at the annual meeting last night.

Submitted to members by Mr. W.H. Hardy, the retiring president, and Mr. Geoffrey Nutt, the secretary, the report pointed out that the clause gave power to local authorities to embark on various forms of entertainment, without any provision being made for limiting losses or termination of the projects in the event of financial failure.

“This encroachment into the field of private enterprise by municipal authorities,” the report added, “calls for the utmost resistance. It should be remembered that any losses incurred will have to be borne by the ratepayers.”

FIREMEN TRAPPED WHEN HUT BLEW UP

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Three firemen were trapped under a wall when a hut used as an explosives store on a Glasgow housing scheme caught fire and blew up shortly after midnight last night. Three civilians standing nearby were injured.

The firemen and one civilian were allowed to go home after treatment at the Victoria Infirmary, but the other civilians, one of whom was Mr. Arthur Thomson, the works inspector, who lives in Garvock-dr., opposite the hut, were detained with extensive leg injuries.

A watchman spotted the blaze and raised the alarm. With another watchman and Mr. Thomson, he started rolling drums of oil clear of the hut. The firemen were inside when it blew up, shattering windows in nearby bungalows and in a corporation boys’ home.

“Roof in the Air”

“People were scattered like ninepins,” a witness told the Hull Daily Mail.

“The roof blew high into the air, and flaming timer was flung over a wide area.”

PARLIAMENT

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The Registration for Employment Order, with its pompous and obscure phraseology and its menacing list of penalties, comes into force today and adds to the difficulty of recognizing that we really are at a time of crisis and that the sittings of Parliament which are to be resumed tomorrow are really very important. It is essential, nevertheless, that we should get these things firmly in out minds. The immediate interest in the Parliamentary settings is centred in the statement to be made by the Foreign Secretary, which according to some reports will indicate a firmer and more positive note in our foreign policy. It is to be hoped that these expectations are well founded, but important as this matter undoubtedly is the outstanding subject in the remainder of the existing Parliamentary Session is the Budget to be introduced.

This cannot fail to settle a number of interesting points. It will reveal whether the realism for which the Chancellor is being so generally praised is solid or amounts to no more than the gift of lucid exposition which marks him off so strongly from any of his colleagues. It must be clear to most observers of the Parliamentary scene by now that the opposition to the Foreign Secretary which was for a long time the principal embarrassment of the Government no longer occupies that position.

The Soviet Union has done its best, unwittingly no doubt, to make Mr. Bevin’s position impregnable and to discredit the small but noisy group which puts Soviet interests before any other. The problem of the Government at present is to commend its domestic policy not to a small group of crypto-Communists, but to a very considerable number of Labour Members of the Parliament and trade unionists who recognize that to support Government policy today means repudiating what they have been learning and teaching for years. It is not to be expected that this should prove an easy matter.

YORKS YACHT CLUB’S BRIDLINGTON SITE

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Bridlington Town Council, by 11 votes to nine, tonight passed an amendment referring back to the property committee a resolution on the minutes that the Council lease to the Royal Yorkshire Yacht Club a portion of the South Cliff Gardens for the erection of new club premises.

There was a discussion for nearly two hours. Ald. E. Lambert moved the minutes, and said that committee had been informed that the Royal Yorkshire Yacht Club had to leave their present premises on March 25 this year, and it was essential that the Club obtain a site on which to erect premises and they asked for part of the South Cliff Gardens.

Mr. T.M. Liddle moved an amendment that the matter be referred back to the property committee for further consideration, for during the past few days, he had heard that the Royal Yorkshire Yacht Club had had the option of extending their tenancy until March, 1933, for an extra £20. He thought that the matter should be more fully considered and that it had been rushed.

K.C.C. Wants To Know

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Kent County Council has requested the 56 borough and district councils in the county to indicate by January 1 which, if any, parts of their areas should be described as “open country” and to what extent any action is required to secure access by the public of those areas for open-air recreation. This inquiry is being made in consequence of the National Perks and Access to the Countryside Act. which came into force last year.

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